National Interests in International Society

National Interests in International Society
Author : Martha Finnemore
Publisher : Cornell University Press
Total Pages : 176
Release : 1996-10-15
ISBN 10 : 9781501707377
ISBN 13 : 150170737X
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

National Interests in International Society Book Description:

How do states know what they want? Asking how interests are defined and how changes in them are accommodated, Martha Finnemore shows the fruitfulness of a constructivist approach to international politics. She draws on insights from sociological institutionalism to develop a systemic approach to state interests and state behavior by investigating an international structure not of power but of meaning and social value. An understanding of what states want, she argues, requires insight into the international social structure of which they are a part. States are embedded in dense networks of transnational and international social relations that shape their perceptions and their preferences in consistent ways. Finnemore focuses on international organizations as one important component of social structure and investigates the ways in which they redefine state preferences. She details three examples in different issue areas. In state structure, she discusses UNESCO and the changing international organization of science. In security, she analyzes the role of the Red Cross and the acceptance of the Geneva Convention rules of war. Finally, she focuses on the World Bank and explores the changing definitions of development in the Third World. Each case shows how international organizations socialize states to accept new political goals and new social values in ways that have lasting impact on the conduct of war, the workings of the international political economy, and the structure of states themselves.


RELATED BOOKS:
National Interests in International Society
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Martha Finnemore
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996-10-15 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

How do states know what they want? Asking how interests are defined and how changes in them are accommodated, Martha Finnemore shows the fruitfulness of a constructivist approach to international politics. She draws on insights from sociological institutionalism to develop a systemic approach to state interests and state behavior by
National Interests in International Society
Language: en
Pages: 154
Authors: Martha Finnemore, University Professor of Political Science and International Affairs Martha Finnemore
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

How do states know what they want? Asking how interests are defined and how changes in them are accommodated, Martha Finnemore shows the fruitfulness of a constructivist approach to international politics. She draws on insights from sociological institutionalism to develop a systemic approach to state interests and state behavior by
The National Interest in Question
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: Christopher Hill
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-08-22 - Publisher: OUP Oxford

For three decades multiculturalism has been the focus of fierce debates. At the same time Europeans have worried, at the national level and at that of the European Union, about how to relate to a world in which their influence has been steadily reducing. But the two discussions, on society
Rules for the World
Language: en
Pages: 226
Authors: Michael Barnett, Professor of Political Science Michael Barnett, Martha Finnemore
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2004 - Publisher:

Provides an innovative perspective on the behavior of international organizations and their effects on global politics.
The National Interest in International Relations Theory
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: S. Burchill
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-05-11 - Publisher: Springer

This is the first systematic and critical analysis of the concept of national interest from the perspective of contemporary theories of International Relations, including realist, Marxist, anarchist, liberal, English School and constructivist perspectives. Scott Burchill explains that although commonly used in diplomacy, the national interest is a highly problematic concept